The Monastic Life of a Medieval Nun

Monasticism, in general, involved the “special and real calling of the Christian, [and] the ideals most beset for every Christian, that he free himself from the world and dedicate himself alone, in a monastic life, to God and Christ.”[1] This monastic life, then, was not only steeped in an engagement in continually renewed struggles to …

Medieval Christian Women

When considering the medieval Christianity, it must be, first, placed in context as, above all, being a significant era in history between the years of the Early Church and the birth of Christianity and our modern-day. To approach it this way means to understand that this period involved many changes and upheavals in the Church, …

Dwight Hopkins and Theologizing toward Black Existentialism

In Chapters 2 and 3 of Being Human: Race, Culture, and Religion (2005), Dwight N. Hopkins individually investigates culture and self as respectively being comprised of, on one hand, human labor,[1] the aesthetic,[2] and the spiritual,[3] and on the other hand, community,[4] communalism,[5] and gender critiques.[6] But, it is in Chapter 4 that examines race …

Dwight N. Hopkins and Theological Anthropology

In the Preface to Being Human: Race, Culture, and Religion (2005), Dwight N. Hopkins proposes “how religious reflection and discussions about the nature of an individual person –what we call theological anthropology –already assumes definite ideas about the self, culture, and race.”[1] Not only is this proposition based on the presumption that notions of self, …

More on the Politics of Jesus: The Early Church and Subordination

In the second half of The Politics of Jesus (1972), J. Howard Yoder asserts that the early church took a stance of subordination, where they put forth a set of rules to the Christian faithful about the roles they should play in society. This kind of concept, in my view, is about the dialectic relationship …

On the “Politics of Jesus”: Jesus as a Political Person

John Howard Yoder situates his basic thesis of The Politics of Jesus (1972) as hinging on the following supposition: whether Jesus was in principle a political person.[1] Though, as Yoder asserts, such a supposition fuels debate in New Testament Studies, I do not see any room for debate on the issue. In my view, Jesus …